Olmsted and Yosemite : Civil War, Abolition, and the National Park idea / Rolf Diamant and Ethan Carr.

By: Diamant, Rolf [author.]Contributor(s): Carr, Ethan [author.]Material type: TextTextPublisher: Amherst, Massachusetts : Library of American Landscape History, [2022]Description: 186 pages : illustrations ; 25 cmISBN: 1952620341; 9781952620348Subject(s): Olmsted, Frederick Law, 1822-1903 | Olmsted, Frederick Law, 1822-1903 | National parks and reserves -- United States -- History | Parks -- New York (State) -- New York -- History | Parks -- California -- Yosemite Valley -- History | National parks and reserves -- United States | Slavery -- United States | Yosemite Valley (Calif.) -- History | Yosemite National Park (Calif.) -- History | Central Park (New York, N.Y.) -- HistoryLOC classification: F868.Y6 | D48 2022F868.Y6 | D53 2022
Contents:
Introduction: three landscapes -- Abolishing slavery and building Central Park -- Remaking government and the Yosemite Grant -- National Parks and a National Park Service -- Conclusion: campfire tales -- Preliminary report upon the Yosemite and Big Tree Grove by Frederick Law Olmsted, August 1865.
Summary: A different narrative of the founding of the national park system. For far too long, all the credit for the national parks has been vested with either mythic "rugged Western pioneers" or a "visionary" like John Muir or Theodore Roosevelt. It is time to revisit Olmsted's Yosemite Report and its enduring vision of popular government using its resources to improve people's lives as an important element to those who fought for a new birth of American freedom. Rolf Diamant and Ethan Carr demonstrate how anti-slavery activism, war, and the remaking of the federal government gave rise to the American public park and concept of national parks. The authors closely examine Frederick Law Olmsted's 1865 Yosemite Report--the key document that expresses the aspirational vision of making great public parks keystone institutions of a renewed liberal democracy. Both Central Park in New York and Yosemite Valley in California became public parks during the tumultuous years before and during the Civil War" --
List(s) this item appears in: New to the Library: May 2022 | Garden of Ideas
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Lending Books Elisabeth C. Miller Library
Tall Shelves
SB470.O5 D52 2022 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 39352800186348
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical reference (pages [151]-165) and index.

Introduction: three landscapes -- Abolishing slavery and building Central Park -- Remaking government and the Yosemite Grant -- National Parks and a National Park Service -- Conclusion: campfire tales -- Preliminary report upon the Yosemite and Big Tree Grove by Frederick Law Olmsted, August 1865.

A different narrative of the founding of the national park system. For far too long, all the credit for the national parks has been vested with either mythic "rugged Western pioneers" or a "visionary" like John Muir or Theodore Roosevelt. It is time to revisit Olmsted's Yosemite Report and its enduring vision of popular government using its resources to improve people's lives as an important element to those who fought for a new birth of American freedom. Rolf Diamant and Ethan Carr demonstrate how anti-slavery activism, war, and the remaking of the federal government gave rise to the American public park and concept of national parks. The authors closely examine Frederick Law Olmsted's 1865 Yosemite Report--the key document that expresses the aspirational vision of making great public parks keystone institutions of a renewed liberal democracy. Both Central Park in New York and Yosemite Valley in California became public parks during the tumultuous years before and during the Civil War" --

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