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James Rose : a voice offstage / Dean Cardasis.

By: Cardasis, Dean.
Contributor(s): Library of American Landscape History.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Masters of modern landscape design: Publisher: Athens : Amherst, Massachusetts : The University of Georgia Press ; Library of American Landscape History, [2017]Description: xiii, 241 pages : illustration (some color) ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780820350950; 0820350958.Subject(s): Rose, James C. (James Clarence), 1913-1991 | Landscape architects -- United States -- Biography | Landscape gardening -- United States | Gardens -- United States
Contents:
Overview -- Dickinson garden and house -- Rose garden and house (part 1) -- Macht garden and house -- Averett garden and house -- G-V controls courtyard -- Rose garden and house (part 2) -- Paley garden -- Anisfield garden -- Glickman garden -- The James Rose Center for Landscape Architectural Research and Design.
Summary: The first biography of James Rose (1913 1991) examines the work of one of the most radical figures in the history of mid-century American landscape design. A landscape architect who explored his profession with words as well as with built works, Rose fearlessly critiqued the patterns of land use he witnessed during a period of rapid suburban development. The alternatives he created were based on innovative principles of sustainability and a sense of the garden as a constantly evolving entity. A classmate of Garrett Eckbo and Dan Kiley at Harvard, Rose was expelled in 1937 for refusing to design in the Beaux-Arts method. In 1940, the year before he received his first commission, Rose also published the last of his influential articles for Architectural Record, a series of essays written with Eckbo and Kiley that would become a manifesto for developing a modernist landscape architecture. Over the next four decades, Rose articulated his philosophy in four major books: Creative Gardens (1958), Gardens Make Me Laugh (1965), Modern American Gardens (1967), and The Heavenly Environment (1987). Rose created gardens throughout the eastern United States, but his most famous work was for his own home in Ridgewood, New Jersey now the James Rose Center for Landscape Architectural Research and Design, a living demonstration of his approach to design as a never-ending process of change and development.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Item holds
Lending Books Tall Shelves SB470.R67 C27 2017 (Browse shelf) Available
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Overview -- Dickinson garden and house -- Rose garden and house (part 1) -- Macht garden and house -- Averett garden and house -- G-V controls courtyard -- Rose garden and house (part 2) -- Paley garden -- Anisfield garden -- Glickman garden -- The James Rose Center for Landscape Architectural Research and Design.

The first biography of James Rose (1913 1991) examines the work of one of the most radical figures in the history of mid-century American landscape design. A landscape architect who explored his profession with words as well as with built works, Rose fearlessly critiqued the patterns of land use he witnessed during a period of rapid suburban development. The alternatives he created were based on innovative principles of sustainability and a sense of the garden as a constantly evolving entity. A classmate of Garrett Eckbo and Dan Kiley at Harvard, Rose was expelled in 1937 for refusing to design in the Beaux-Arts method. In 1940, the year before he received his first commission, Rose also published the last of his influential articles for Architectural Record, a series of essays written with Eckbo and Kiley that would become a manifesto for developing a modernist landscape architecture. Over the next four decades, Rose articulated his philosophy in four major books: Creative Gardens (1958), Gardens Make Me Laugh (1965), Modern American Gardens (1967), and The Heavenly Environment (1987). Rose created gardens throughout the eastern United States, but his most famous work was for his own home in Ridgewood, New Jersey now the James Rose Center for Landscape Architectural Research and Design, a living demonstration of his approach to design as a never-ending process of change and development.

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