A place where sunflowers grow = 砂漠に咲いたひまわり /

A place where sunflowers grow = Sabaku ni saita himawari / story, Amy Lee-Tai ; illustrations, Felicia Hoshino ; [Japanese translation, Marc Akio Lee].

By: Lee-Tai, Amy, 1964-Contributor(s): Hoshino, FeliciaMaterial type: TextTextLanguage: English, Japanese Original language: English Publication details: San Francisco, Calif. : [Berkeley, CA] : Children's Book Press ; Distributed to the book trade by Publishers Group West, c2006Description: 31 p. : col. ill. ; 29 cmISBN: 0892392150; 9780892392155Other title: 砂漠に咲いたひまわり Other title: Sabaku ni saita himawariSubject(s): Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Juvenile fiction | World War, 1939-1945 -- Japanese Americans -- Juvenile fiction | Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Fiction | World War, 1939-1945 -- Japanese Americans -- Fiction | Japanese language materials -- BilingualLOC classification: PZ49.31 | .L44 2006Summary: Based on the experiences of the author’s mother and grandmother at the Topaz camp in Utah, this gentle book emphasizes the human dignity of the prisoners there and offers hope that we will “work toward a world that will never repeat—to any group of people—what happened to Japanese Americans during World War II.” (Miller Library Staff)Summary: While she and her family are interned at Topaz Relocation Center during World War II, Mari gradually adjusts as she enrolls in an art class, makes a friend, plants sunflowers and waits for them to grow.
List(s) this item appears in: Gardening in Wartime | Garden of Cultural Diversity for Youth | Japanese American Exclusion EO 9066 resources
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Lending Books Elisabeth C. Miller Library
Youth Collection
SB451 .L44 2006 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 39352800025991
Total holds: 0

Based on the experiences of the author’s mother and grandmother at the Topaz camp in Utah, this gentle book emphasizes the human dignity of the prisoners there and offers hope that we will “work toward a world that will never repeat—to any group of people—what happened to Japanese Americans during World War II.” (Miller Library Staff)

While she and her family are interned at Topaz Relocation Center during World War II, Mari gradually adjusts as she enrolls in an art class, makes a friend, plants sunflowers and waits for them to grow.

Recommended for primary school (age 6-12) and up.

Parallel text in English and Japanese.

Powered by Koha