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The songs of trees : stories from nature's great connectors / David George Haskell.

By: Haskell, David George [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, New York : Viking, [2017]Description: xi, 292 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780525427520; 052542752X.Subject(s): Forest ecology | Symbiosis | TreesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Songs of trees.Other classification: NAT034000 | SCI100000 | NAT010000
Contents:
Preface -- Part 1 -- Ceibo -- Balsam fir -- Sabal palm -- Green ash -- Interlude : Mitsumata -- Part 2 -- Hazel -- Redwood and ponderosa pine -- Interlude : Maple -- Part 3 -- Cottonwood -- Callery pear -- Olive -- Japanese white pine.
Summary: The author repeatedly visits a dozen trees around the world to stop, listen, and look, exploring each tree's connections with webs of fungi, bacterial communities, cooperative and destructive animals, and other plants, and demonstrating how the lives of trees and people are deeply interwoven. Several trees, including a balsam fir in Ontario and an Amazonian ceibo, are located in areas that seem mostly natural, but which are affected by industrial development and climate change. Haskell also turns to trees in places where humans seem to have subdued "nature"--a pear tree on a Manhattan sidewalk, an olive tree in Jerusalem -- demonstrating that wildness permeates every location.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Lending Books Elisabeth C. Miller Library
Tall Shelves
SB455.5 .H27 2017 (Browse shelf) Available 39352800168916
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 259-280) and index.

Preface -- Part 1 -- Ceibo -- Balsam fir -- Sabal palm -- Green ash -- Interlude : Mitsumata -- Part 2 -- Hazel -- Redwood and ponderosa pine -- Interlude : Maple -- Part 3 -- Cottonwood -- Callery pear -- Olive -- Japanese white pine.

The author repeatedly visits a dozen trees around the world to stop, listen, and look, exploring each tree's connections with webs of fungi, bacterial communities, cooperative and destructive animals, and other plants, and demonstrating how the lives of trees and people are deeply interwoven. Several trees, including a balsam fir in Ontario and an Amazonian ceibo, are located in areas that seem mostly natural, but which are affected by industrial development and climate change. Haskell also turns to trees in places where humans seem to have subdued "nature"--a pear tree on a Manhattan sidewalk, an olive tree in Jerusalem -- demonstrating that wildness permeates every location.

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